Welcome to the Molecular Geochemistry Laboratory

If chemistry is the central science, then geochemistry is the central science as applied to understanding the natural world around us.

Geochemists seek to answer questions relating to the evolution of life on Earth and how metalloenzymes may have evolved, the chemistry of the oceans and how they are affected by global warming, the interplay between flora, fauna and the environment in chemical terms, how pollutants interact with soils and minerals, and how radioactive waste can be securely stored for millennia. We do this by connecting the very big — mountains — with the very small — atoms and molecules, and the very fast — fundamental reactions — with the often very slow — weathering

If you share our passion for understanding and explaining how the world works — join us! To find out about opportunities in our laboratory, contact one of the group leaders: Jean-François BoilyMichael Holmboe, C. André Ohlin, Andrey Shchukarev, and Staffan Sjöberg.

Apply for a postdoc position and join the Holmboe group

Thanks to funding from the Kempe foundations the Holmboe group is now looking for a postdoc to join a project aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the immobilization and protection of sedimentary and ancient DNA (aDNA) by clay and other minerals. The postdoc fellowship consists of a two-year stipend, and the research will be performed in collaboration with researchers from the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science.

The deadline for application is 2018-06-15
Please read more and apply using the link below:
http://www.umu.se/english/about-umu/news-events/grants/6-831-18

Chapter published in Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy

17O NMR as a Tool in Discrete Metal Oxide Cluster Chemistry

in Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy. Link.

C. André Ohlin, William H. Casey

Abstract: This chapter covers recent developments in 17O NMR spectroscopy as applied to discrete metal oxide clusters, particularly in the context of their use as models in geochemistry and catalysis. Dynamic 17O NMR methods based on the McConnell–Bloch equations are explored in depth, and recent advances are reviewed. High-pressure NMR methods are also discussed and reviewed, as are recent developments in the use of density functional theory in the computation of 17O NMR shifts in polyoxometalates. The emphasis of the chapter is on the new developments that promise to reinvigorate 17O NMR as a central tool in the study of aqueous chemical kinetics, with the most urgent challenges being understanding the rates of isotopic substitution into bridging oxygens in clusters.