Welcome to the Molecular Geochemistry Laboratory

If chemistry is the central science, then geochemistry is the central science as applied to understanding the natural world around us.

Geochemists seek to answer questions relating to the evolution of life on Earth and how metalloenzymes may have evolved, the chemistry of the oceans and how they are affected by global warming, the interplay between flora, fauna and the environment in chemical terms, how pollutants interact with soils and minerals, and how radioactive waste can be securely stored for millennia. We do this by connecting the very big — mountains — with the very small — atoms and molecules, and the very fast — fundamental reactions — with the often very slow — weathering

If you share our passion for understanding and explaining how the world works — join us! To find out about opportunities in our laboratory, contact one of the group leaders: Erik BjörnJean-François BoilyMichael Holmboe, C. André Ohlin, Andrey Shchukarev, and Staffan Sjöberg.

Clays, New Perspectives, Challenges & Opportunities workshop at MIT

Michae Holmboe gave an invited talk on the characterization of clay microstructure and molecular dynamics simulations – at the workshop “Clays, New Perspectives, Challenges & Opportunities”, May 2-3 2019, hosted by Prof Andrew Whittle and his postdoc Ali Seiphoori at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Read more here: clays.mit.edu

PDF/XRD/EXAFS/NMR/FTIR paper on phosphate binding on aluminum hydroxide

A multi-institution collaboration involving University of Wyoming, Argonne National Laboratory, Canadian Light Source, Stony Brook University and Huazhong Agricultural University.

“Phosphate Sorption Speciation and Precipitation Mechanisms on
Amorphous Aluminum Hydroxide” will soon be coming out in the Open Access Journal Soil Systems

Authors: Xiaoming Wang, Brian L. Phillips, Jean-François Boily, Yongfeng Hu, Zhen Hu, Peng Yang, Xionghan Feng, Wenqian Xu, Mengqiang Zhu *

Water vapour condensation paper out now in ES&T

A paper (link here) by Wei Cheng & Khalil Hanna (École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie, Rennes, France) and J.-F. Boily. We show that low loadings of organic matter on minerals make surfaces more hydrophobic while high loading make surfaces more
hydrophilic. This work is one of the several to be published from Wei’s 6-month visit in Umeå in March-September 2018.

 

 

 

Paper on protonation in Anderson-type POMs published in Inorganic Chemistry

Direct Single- and Double-Side Triol-Functionalization of the Mixed Type Anderson Polyoxotungstate [Cr(OH)3W6O21]6–”

in Inorganic Chemistry, 2019, 58(1), 106-113. Link

Nadiia I. Gumerova, Tania Caldera Fraile, Alexander Roller, Gerald Giester, Magda Pascual-Borràs, C. André Ohlin, and Annette Rompel

Abstract: Since the first successful triol-functionalization of the Anderson polyoxometalates, the protons of the central octahedron X(OH)6 (X—heteroatom) have been considered as a prerequisite for their functionalization and therefore the functionalization of Anderson structures from the unprotonated sides have never been reported. Herein, for the first time, we organically functionalized the mixed-type Anderson polyoxometalate with real-time observation of hybrid anion formation.